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When Does Tick Season In New Castle Start?

February 22, 2021

 

Among the most lethal insects on earth are those that withdraw blood from animals and humans. Typically, these kinds of pests are small and they bite or sting elusively. The blemishes they leave are usually red, itchy, and swollen. Unfortunately, that’s the least of the concerns. Since these critters go between a plethora of hosts, the transmission of disease is very likely.

Ticks are one species that absorb blood and pass on life-threatening conditions. Many people believe that these bugs cannot survive cold weather, but several can withstand the temperatures.This is especially true if the winter season is mild. Deer ticks, also called black-legged ticks, are carriers for Lyme disease and they can specifically get through chill. Learn how to prevent these insects in New Castle before their peak spring season with Moyer Pest Control. 

a deer tick in the palm of a hand

What Ticks Can Survive the Winter?

As already mentioned, deer ticks can remain active throughout colder months. American dog and lone star ticks might as well. When female deer ticks have finished feeding, they are 0.39 of an inch long. Generally, both males and females are somewhere between 0.14 to 0.20 of an inch long. Their eight, dark legs are where they get their alternate name from. These red-brown or brown bugs tend to target deer and livestock, which inspires their main title. American dog ticks also have another name; they’re occasionally referred to as wood ticks. While they may be the same length as their black-legged relatives, their females are a larger 0.59 of an inch long after feasting. They too have four sets of legs. White body streaks are what make the lone star tick stand out. Moreover, the females have round back marks. Like the two previously discussed subspecies, these insects have eight legs. They won’t discriminate when it comes to a host. They will drink blood from humans, domestic animals, wild creatures, and livestock.

Two important things to know about ticks are:

  1. Where They Live: Tick populations are plentiful in grassy pastures, wooded areas, and zones rampant with animals. The more humidity and shade, the better. Be on alert when in these locations or in an outdoor setting. Remember, these critters can embed themselves in your skin without you feeling it. 
  2. What Illnesses They Spread: Seek immediate medical attention if you feel unwell after a tick bite. Some crucial symptoms are breathing difficulties, weakness, headache, fever, and nausea. Further, these pests are associated with the Heartland virus, ehrlichiosis, tularemia, and more.

What Are Ways to Prevent Ticks? 

Ticks await a warmer climate to be out in full swing, but their resting cycle is only semi-dormant. Do these things to guard yourself at all times:

  • Keep the grass cut and greenery trimmed. Discard the organic debris on the lawn.

  • Put on long socks, pants, boots, and a long-sleeved shirt when headed to a tick-ridden spot. 

  • Make use of products containing tick repellent before forging out. 

  • Scan your clothes, skin, and pet right away after being outdoors. 

  • Ask your pet’s veterinarian about tick treatments and prevention. 

  • Inspect and groom your domestic animal’s fur. 

  • Call Moyer Pest Control if you have critters that ticks attach to, such as rats.  

How Will Moyer Pest Control Handle Ticks?

The technicians staffed by us at Moyer Pest Control are highly trained. They have the expertise to accurately identify tick species and select an appropriate treatment. Our solutions are safe for humans, domestic animals, and vegetation. Each product is approved by the Environmental Protection Agency. Ticks will be eliminated without harm to anyone or anything. Our plans are friendly to the wallet and comprehensive. We can’t wait to take your call today at Moyer Pest Control!

Tags: Pest Prevention home pest control ticks

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